The 11 Best Tennis Racquets 2019 – We’ll Help You Choose What’s Right For You!

Looking for your first racquet?

Or an upgrade?

A replacement for your old one?

We have 11 great options for you to pick from, each offering excellent performance, but in its own way. Whether you are looking for excellent comfort, spin-friendly or terrific power, you should be able to find the best tennis racquet that will suit your skill level and playstyle. The racquets that you’re gonna see here is a combination of beginner, intermediate and pro-level tennis racquets.

And to help you with choosing the right racquet, we are going to walk you through the things that you should pay attention to when shopping for a tennis racquet.

Shall we begin?

Top 11 racquets of 2019

1. Babolat Pure Aero 2019 – Great choice for strong beginner to advanced players

SPECS

Head Size: 100 in² / 645cm²
Length: 27in / 68.58cm
Strung Weight: 11.2oz
Balance: 12.99in / 4 pts HL
Swingweight: 324
Stiffness: 67
Material: Graphite
String Pattern:16 Mains / 19 Crosses

Up first on our roundup is the Pure Aero 2019 tennis racquet by Babolat, which is a nice option if you are looking for a stiff racquet with a good amount of spin.

With a flex rating of 67 (or should we say stiffness rating), the Pure Aero 2019 isn’t the stiffest racquet in the world, but it’s pretty up there. What the stiffness allows is improved power transfer from the racquet to the ball, as well as a more poppy feel. But the good news is, this racquet is more comfortable and arm-friendly.

What also contributes to the power of the Pure Aero 2019 racquet is its weight. Weighing 10.6 ounces unstrung, it’s a pretty hefty racquet, which allows it to deliver more powerful shots.

The power potential of this racquet is brought down a little though by its 4-point head-light design – with its weight shifted back half an inch, this 27-inch racquet is not only quite powerful but also fairly easy to control for its weight.

Babolat also boasts an aerodynamic frame in the Pure Aero 2019, which allows the 100 square inch tennis head move more quickly, thus increasing ball speed and spin potential.

Overall, Pure Aero 2019 is an excellent power-delivering tennis racquet. It won’t be the most shock-absorbing racquet in the world, but if you want power with a little bit of control, then this one may be the best option.

Pros
  • Easy access to spin
  • Powerful
  • Explosive serves
Negatives:
  • Stiff frame
Groundstrokes
87%
Volleys
81%
Serves
88%
Returns
81%
Power
91%
Control
78%
Maneuverability
77%
Stability
81%
Comfort
83%
Touch/Feel
80%
Topspin
94%
Slice
82%
0
Overall Performance
0
Design

2. Wilson Clash 98

SPECS

Head Size: 98 in² / 632cm²
Length: 27in / 68.58cm
Strung Weight: 11.5oz
Balance: 12.4in / 9 pts HL
Swingweight: 326
Stiffness: 55
Material: Graphite
String Pattern:16 Mains / 19 Crosses

If you want a racquet that has a great combination of power without sacrificing control, then this one may be the best tennis racquet for you.

The 2019 Clash 98 racquet boasts an extremely flexible frame rated 55 RDC. This racquet is thus the most flexible and shock-absorbing racquet on the list. It’s going to be an excellent option if your joints are very sensitive to shocks.

Not only that, but this racquet is also very maneuverable – with its weight shifted 9 points or 1.125 inches towards the handle, you are getting perhaps the best maneuverability among the racquets overviewed.

This racquet still is a heavy model – 11.5 ounces when strung – but it’s much more controllable and soft than stiffer racquets that weigh the same.

With that being said, the Clash 98 is going to have the a great power transfer as well as comfort and control. Plus, keep in mind that this racquet has a smaller 98 square inch racquet head.

In conclusion, the Wilson 2019 Clash 98 isn’t for everyone. It’s heavy, so you need to have the strength and good technique to fully utilize its controllable power. If you want comfort most of all, then this racquet may be the one.

Pros
  • Great combination of power, spin and touch
  • Unparalleled comfort
Negatives:
  • Heavy
Groundstrokes
88%
Volleys
81%
Serves
84%
Returns
83%
Power
90%
Control
83%
Maneuverability
84%
Stability
84%
Comfort
85%
Touch/Feel
80%
Topspin
87%
Slice
80%
0
Overall Performance
0
Design

3. Babolat Pure Strike

SPECS

Head Size: 98 in² / 632cm²
Length: 27in / 68.58cm
Strung Weight: 11.3oz
Balance: 13in / 4 pts HL
Swingweight: 323
Stiffness: 67
Material: Graphite
String Pattern:16 Mains / 19 Crosses


If you care about power but also value comfort in your tennis racquets, then the Babolat Pure Strike may be an excellent option for you.

This modern player’s racquet delivers controllable power. The Pure Strike racquet features Babolat’s Hybrid Frame technology combining solid power with a good amount of control.

This racquet’s specs are very representative of what the frame does. First, we have a flex rating of 67, which makes the Pure Strike racquet a little less stiff than Pure Aero and Pure Drive racquets. 1-2 points should be quite enough to make a difference in how this racquet deals with shocks.

On the other hand, the Pure Strike racquet is heavier than the Pure Aero and Pure Drive racquets when unstrung – weighing 10.8 ounces, it’s 0.2 ounces heavier. Perhaps a small difference, this can bring big improvements in the right hands.

And the combination of a bit heavier weight with a less stiff frame is what Babolat calls controllable power.

The head side in this racquet is also different – its area is 98 square inches. The smaller head size will require more skill from tennis players for accurate shots, so the Pure Strike is less beginner-friendly than the other two racquets.

However, the Pure Strike racquet is a little cheaper than the Pure Drive and Pure Aero racquets, though it still isn’t a budget tennis racquet.

Other than what we described above, the three Babolat tennis racquets are identical – they have the same length of 27 inches, the 16 x 19 string pattern delivering a balance between power & spin, and a similar head-light design.

In the end, if you want a little bit of everything, the Babolat Pure Strike racquet may be the best tennis racquet for you.

Pros
  • A good balance of power and comfort
  • Stable and fairly responsive
Negatives:
  • Heavy

Groundstrokes
92%
Volleys
85%
Serves
86%
Returns
89%
Power
86%
Control
84%
Maneuverability
90%
Stability
86%
Comfort
88%
Touch/Feel
85%
Topspin
92%
Slice
91%
0
Overall Performance
0
Design

4. Wilson Pro Staff RF97 Autograph

SPECS

Head Size: 97 in² / 625cm²
Length: 27in / 68.58cm
Strung Weight: 11.5oz
Balance: 12.38in / 9 pts HL
Swingweight: 335
Stiffness: 68
Material: Graphite
String Pattern:16 Mains / 19 Crosses

The Wilson Pro Staff RF97 Autograph is the exact racquet model used by Roger Federer. This is a high-performance racquet that only a few will be able to master.

The first thing to catch the eye in the Pro Staff RF97 Autograph racquet is its weight. When strung, this thing weighs 12.5 ounces, noticeably heavier than all other tennis racquets on our list. Thanks to such a weight, the RF97 Autograph delivers unparalleled power for those deep penetrating shots into the back of the court.

Not every tennis player is physically capable to wield this absolute weapon – this racquet is going to fatigue you pretty quickly if you are unprepared.

To balance out the power of this racquet a bit, Wilson has made this racquet head-light. To be more precise, it’s 8 points or 1-inch headlight, which makes it quite maneuverable for its weight. This racquet certainly won’t be as quick as something like HEAD Graphene 360 Speed MP, but it will be quite mobile.

The RF97 Autograph isn’t too stiff either – rated 68 RDC, it’s fairly flexible, so it shouldn’t be too hard on your joints. However, 68 RDC is still relatively stiff, and given the weight of this racquet, you shouldn’t play with it if you have arm injuries.

In the end, if you are sure that you have what it takes to wield the RF97 Autograph, then it may be able to push your performance to a completely new level.

Pros
  • Poweful and stable
  • Crisp feel
Negatives:
  • You should have the strength needed to be able to swing it

Groundstrokes
88%
Volleys
90%
Serves
91%
Returns
85%
Power
85%
Control
89%
Maneuverability
75%
Stability
95%
Comfort
89%
Touch/Feel
91%
Topspin
88%
Slice
90%
0
Overall Performance
0
Design

5. Babolat Pure Drive 2018


SPECS

Head Size: 100 in² / 645cm²
Length: 27in / 68.58cm
Strung Weight: 11.2oz
Balance: 12.99in / 4 pts HL
Swingweight: 321
Stiffness: 71
Material: Graphite
String Pattern:16 Mains / 19 Crosses


The Pure Drive tennis racquet by Babolat is all about power. While its specs are very similar to those of the Pure Aero 2019 racquet we’ve just reviewed, the construction features make these two racquets very different.

First, the string pattern. The Pure Drive racquet features Babolat’s FSI technology to provide tennis players with a larger sweet spot. As a result, you are getting increased power delivery even with off-center shots.

The stiffness in this tennis racquet is rated at 72, which is just a tad higher than in the Pure Aero 2019 tennis racquet. However, if you are looking for maximum power, even 1 point can make a difference.

Stiff racquets can be hard on joints, and Babolat deals with it with its Cortex vibration absorption technology, which should make the Pure Drive less harsh on the arms without significant loss of power.

What also contributes to the comfort of this racquet is its head-light design. The balance point in this tennis racquet is just like in the Pure Aero, which should make their controllability similar.

However, the Pure Drive appears to be a better option than the Pure Aero for tennis players who demand maximum power transfer, even though the racquets weigh and are sized the same. This racquet is stiffer than the Pure Aero and more power-centered.

Pros
  • Easy access to spin and tremendous power
  • Fairly maneuverable
Negatives:
  • Stiff. Not recommended for tennis elbow sufferers.

Groundstrokes
84%
Volleys
81%
Serves
88%
Returns
80%
Power
89%
Control
76%
Maneuverability
81%
Stability
85%
Comfort
78%
Touch/Feel
75%
Topspin
89%
Slice
81%
0
Overall Performance
0
Design

6. Prince Phantom Pro 93P

SPECS

Head Size: 93 in² / 600cm²
Length: 27in / 68.58cm
Strung Weight: 12.2oz
Balance: 12.4in / 9 pts HL
Swingweight: 330
Stiffness: 61
Material: Textreme/Graphite
String Pattern:18 Mains / 20 Crosses

The Prince Phantom Pro 93P racquet is unlike everything we’ve overviewed so far – it boasts a unique combination of power, control, and stability.

Rated 61 RDC, the Phantom Pro 93P is the most flexible racquet we’ve reviewed up until this point. Thanks to this, this tennis racquet is going to be very easy on the joints, albeit with the tradeoff of decreased power transfer from your arm to the ball.

Not only that, but the Phantom Pro 93P racquet is quite heavy, weighing 12.2 ounces – nearly as much as the Wilson Pro Staff RF97 Autograph did! Thanks to such a heavyweight, the loss of power transfer capability is somewhat compensated in this racquet.

The Phantom Pro 93P racquet is also extremely maneuverable thanks to its 9 points of head-light balance when strung!

Now, the numbers above place this racquet fairly close to the RF97 Autograph. However, remember that the RF97 had a flex rating of 68, while the Pro 93P is rated 61. Thus, the Prince Phantom Pro 93P is going to be a less powerful but a more comfortable racquet.

The 18 x 20 string pattern should also make this racquet deliver more stable shots and decrease its spin potential, which may or may not be good for you.

And perhaps the biggest eye-catcher in this racquet is its small head size at 93 square inches – you need to be a very accurate player to master this racquet.

Considering all of the above, the Phantom Pro 93P racquet is a powerhouse designed for skilled players who want a racquet that is more forgiving on the joints. It’s heavy, and its head size is unforgiving, but it boasts a very unique blend of power and comfort.

Cons:

  • Suitable for stronger players
Pros
  • Solid amount of power.
  • Very stable and maneuverable.
  • Flexible and easy on the elbows and arms
Negatives:
  • Only suitable for stronger players

Groundstrokes
87%
Volleys
86%
Serves
84%
Returns
82%
Power
77%
Control
94%
Maneuverability
78%
Stability
83%
Comfort
91%
Touch/Feel
91%
Topspin
77%
Slice
94%
0
Overall Performance
0
Design

7. Wilson 2018 Blade 98 Countervail

SPECS

Head Size: 98 in² / 632cm²
Length: 27in / 68.58cm
Strung Weight: 11.3oz
Balance: 13.1in / 3 pts HL
Swingweight: 326
Stiffness: 66
Material: Graphite
String Pattern:16 Mains / 19 Crosses

If you want a powerful and at the same time flexible tennis racquet, then Wilson’s 2018 Blade 98 16 x 19 Countervail may be an excellent option for you.

In terms of flex, this racquet is close to the HEAD Graphene 360 Speed MP racquet, but these two models are very different.

With a flex rating of 65, the 2018 Blade 98 is rather flexible, and it isn’t much stiffer than the Speed MP racquet. Thus, if you want a racquet that will be easier on your joints, either can work.

However, when it comes to speed and power, things are different. 360 Speed MP is a more maneuverable racquet, while 2018 Blade is more power-oriented.

Part of the reason for this is the more even weight distribution in the Blade racquet. This racquet is just 3 points or 0.375 inches head-light, which is much less than the 8 points of the Speed MP. Due to this difference in weight distribution, the Blade racquet is less maneuverable and more powerful.

In fact, this racquet may be less maneuverable than all of the racquets reviewed precisely because its weight is less shifted towards the handle.

In the end, you are getting an interesting mix of features – good flexibility and great power delivery. However, you are also getting a relatively immobile racquet, so the Blade 98 will be better for those players who have no problems with speed but lack power.

Pros
  • Powerful for groundstrokes
  • Comfort, great for your elbows
Negatives:
  • Poor power during serves

Groundstrokes
84%
Volleys
85%
Serves
78%
Returns
81%
Power
80%
Control
84%
Maneuverability
77%
Stability
86%
Comfort
91%
Touch/Feel
83%
Topspin
85%
Slice
89%
0
Overall Performance
0
Design

8. Yonex Ezone 98

SPECS

Head Size: 98 in² / 632cm²
Length: 27in / 68.58cm
Strung Weight: 11.4oz
Balance: 12.79in / 6 pts HL
Swingweight: 316
Stiffness: 63
Material: Graphite, Nanometric DR, Quake Shut Gel Air
String Pattern:16 Mains / 19 Crosses

The Ezone 98 tennis racquet by Yonex combines features from the HEAD Graphene 360 Speed MP and Radical Pro tennis racquets.

On one hand, the Ezone 98 racquet has the flexibility of the Speed MP. With the same flex rating of 63, this tennis racquet again is a good option if you are looking for a comfortable racquet that will be easy on your joints.

On the other hand, you have the maneuverability and head size of the Radical Pro. Just like the Radical Pro, the Ezone 98 has a 6-point/0.75-inch head-light balance, as well as a 98 square inch racquet head.

This combination of features means that the Ezone 98 is a highly shock-absorbent and flexible tennis racquet that has good maneuverability and decent power. And it racquet should sit somewhere in between of the two HEAD racquets in terms of feel and performance.

With that being said, the power transfer capability of this racquet will be closer to the Speed MP due to the same flex rating. And overall, this racquet sacrifices power transfer for comfort.

If you have arm injuries or just don’t like stiff tennis racquets, the Ezone 98 racquet’s balance of maneuverability, power, and control may be excellent for you.

Pros
  • Shock-absorbing and comfortable.
  • Easy access to spin
Negatives:
  • Low power

Groundstrokes
85%
Volleys
79%
Serves
88%
Returns
79%
Power
87%
Control
79%
Maneuverability
86%
Stability
75%
Comfort
80%
Touch/Feel
78%
Topspin
89%
Slice
76%
0
Overall Performance
0
Design

9. Wilson Burn 100S CV

SPECS

Head Size: 100 in² / 645cm²
Length: 27in / 68.58cm
Strung Weight: 11.3oz
Balance: 13.35in / 1 pts HL
Swingweight: 327
Stiffness: 73
Material: Graphite
String Pattern:18 Mains / 16 Crosses

The Wilson Burn 100S CV tennis racquet is a more power-oriented variant of the Wilson 2018 Blade 98. Not only that, but the Burn 100S CV racquet delivers performance similar to that of the overviewed Babolat tennis racquets.

First of all, this racquet is relatively stiff, rated 69 RDC. As you already know, stiffness means better power transfer at the cost of comfort. Babolat racquets had a flex rating of around 70, so the Burn 100S CV should be close to them in this regard.

The weight balance in this racquet is again similar – 4 points or half an inch head-light when strung. Such weight balance adds a little bit of maneuverability to the racquet while not taking away much from its power potential.

With that being said, the Burn 100S CV has a better spin potential than the Babolat racquets thanks to its 18 x 16 string pattern. Among the so-called open-string patterns, this string pattern tends to deliver increased spin potential. But to master the improved spin, you obviously need to have the skill!

In the end, if you want a powerful, a bit maneuverable, and a spinny tennis racquet, then Wilson Burn 100S CV may be the best tennis racquet for you. However, you will need to buy strings for it since it comes unstrung!

Pros
  • Solid power and depth
  • High spin potential
Negatives:
  • Average maneuverability 

Groundstrokes
85%
Volleys
88%
Serves
84%
Returns
83%
Power
85%
Control
86%
Maneuverability
83%
Stability
84%
Comfort
78%
Touch/Feel
87%
Topspin
84%
Slice
85%
0
Overall Performance
0
Design

10. HEAD Graphene 360 Speed MP

SPECS

Head Size: 100 in² / 645cm²
Length: 27in / 68.58cm
Strung Weight: 11.2oz
Balance: 12.99in / 4 pts HL
Swingweight: 317
Stiffness: 63
Material: Graphene/Graphite
String Pattern:16 Mains / 19 Crosses

If you want a more maneuverable and comfortable tennis racquet, then the Graphene 360 Speed MP racquet by HEAD may be excellent for you.

Perhaps the biggest benefit of this tennis racquet is its flexibility. With a Babolat RDC rating of 63, this is one flexible racquet. It’s going to be noticeably more comfortable and shock-absorbing than all Babolat racquets we reviewed earlier.

What is also great about this tennis racquet is its maneuverability. While this racquet weighs around the same as the Babolat racquets – around 10.6 ounces when unstrung and 11.2 when strung – its more pronounced head-light design makes it a quicker and more controllable racquet.

The balance point of this racquet is offset by one inch (8 points) from the center towards the handle. The Babolat racquets were 4 points offset, and this means that they are somewhat less controllable than the Graphene 360 Speed MP racquet.

With that being said, the Head Graphene 360 Speed MP racquet won’t be as good in terms of power delivery, partly due to the less stiff frame. What this means that those who have weaker shots would benefit more from more power-potent racquets like the Babolat ones.

However, if you do want a flexible, easier access to spin and maneuverable racquet, then the Graphene 360 Speed MP racquet may be the one.

Pros
  • Highly maneuverable.
  • Can deliver plenty of spin
Negatives:
  • Relatively weak plow through

Groundstrokes
80%
Volleys
82%
Serves
80%
Returns
75%
Power
81%
Control
81%
Maneuverability
85%
Stability
75%
Comfort
79%
Touch/Feel
76%
Topspin
80%
Slice
83%
0
Overall Performance
0
Design

11. HEAD Graphene 360 Radical Pro

SPECS

Head Size: 98 in² / 632cm²
Length: 27in / 68.58cm
Strung Weight: 11.5oz
Balance: 12.75in / 6 pts HL
Swingweight: 325
Stiffness: 68
Material: Graphene/Graphite
String Pattern:16 Mains / 19 Crosses

The HEAD Graphene 360 Radical Pro is a middle-ground tennis racquet model between the Graphene 360 Speed MP and Babolat racquets. If you think that the Speed MP is too weak for you and the Babolats are too stiff, this may be the one.

The balance shift in this tennis racquet isn’t as dramatic as in the Speed MP – the Radical Pro is 6 points or 0.75 inches head-light versus the 1 inch of the Speed MP. This allows for a slight increase in power, but with the tradeoff of a bit decreased control.

The Radical Pro tennis racquet is also a little stiffer than the Speed MP – 67 vs 63 RDC stiffness – but it should be more flexible than Babolat racquets. Thus, in terms of comfort and power transfer, the Radical Pro is again between Speed MP and Babolat racquets.

Another thing that is different in this racquet is its head size – sized at 98 square inches, the head of the Radical Pro makes this racquet less beginner-friendly since you need to be more accurate to hit the ball with the sweet spot.

Also, keep in mind that this particular variant of the Graphene 360 Radical Pro ships unstrung. If you have your favorite strings though, this won’t be a problem. The string pattern here is the familiar 16 x 19.

In the end, if you want a quick racquet that doesn’t sacrifice much power, the Radical Pro may be the best option. 

Pros
  • Solid maneuverability.
  • Great combination of power, spin and feel.
Negatives:
  • Some issues with stability

Groundstrokes
87%
Volleys
82%
Serves
76%
Returns
80%
Power
80%
Control
75%
Maneuverability
88%
Stability
75%
Comfort
74%
Touch/Feel
72%
Topspin
84%
Slice
75%

0
Overall Performance
0
Design

 

How To Choose The Best Tennis Racquet For You

You’ve seen terms like weight balance, power, stiffness, spin, and whatnot throughout the reviews. What do they all mean and how can you stack up all those numbers to determine which racquet is the best for you?

Well, to help you with finding the best tennis racquet, we are now going to overview the key specs and features that you should pay attention to.

Head size

First comes the racquet head size.

The head size didn’t vary much in the racquets reviewed – only from 93 to 100 square inches. There are much bigger and smaller racquets out there. Smallest racquets may go as low as 80, while the largest racquets can rack 120 square inches and even more.

The larger the racquet head, the more forgiving it will be since you won’t have to be as accurate to hit the racquet’s sweet spot. On the other hand, large racquets tend to be heavier, more sluggish, and perhaps less aerodynamic.

If you are a speedy player who wants control, you will want to avoid large racquets. However, if you aren’t too accurate of a tennis player, you might need to go for a larger racquet, even if it means that you will be slower on the court.

Length

All the racquets reviewed were 27 inches long, but tennis racquets can be longer.

A longer racquet is going to provide you with more leverage for the swing, thus increasing your swing power. Plus, it will increase your reach on the court.

With that being said, longer racquets tend to be heavier and slower, which may be a problem for some people. Go for a longer racquet only if you need the advantages described above.

Grip size

The grip size is the diameter of a tennis racquet’s handle. US grip sizes usually range from 4 to 4-3/4 inches.

It’s very important that you get a properly sized racquet. A too thick grip won’t allow you to get a good hold onto the racquet and may even strain your arm. A too thin grip may twist your hand, again leading to arm injuries.

It’s fairly easy to make the measurements to determine a proper grip size for you:

  • Open your dominant playing hand. Fully extend your fingers and keep them close together.
  • Take a ruler. Align it so that it’s parallel with your ring finger. The end of the ruler needs to be lined with the bottom of your palm’s second (middle) crease.
  • The distance between the tip of your ring finger and the second crease of your hand will be your grip size.

If unsure, go for a smaller size – you can always use an overgrip to adjust the size. You can’t do such a thing with a larger size, so it’s always safer to go with a small size.

String pattern

We’ve seen a few string pattern varieties among the racquets reviewed – 18 x 20, 16 x 19, and 18 x 16. The string pattern refers to the arrangement of the strings in the frame – an 18 x 20 racquet takes 18 main and 20 cross strings, for example.

String patterns can be more open or denser. For example, 16 x 19 is a denser pattern than 18 x 16.

The more open the string pattern, the higher the racquet spin potential. In open string patterns, the gaps between the strings are bigger, which allows the ball to penetrate deeper into the strings and be attacked harder. This results in a higher spin potential.

Conversely, denser patterns are more controllable and intuitive for less experienced players since they don’t have as much of the distracting spin.

To list a few, here are the strings patterns you can find out there:

  • 18 x 20, which delivers more stable shots.
  • 16 x 19 & 16 x 18, which deliver a good balance between power, control, and spin.
  • 14 x 16, 16 x 16, 18 x 16, 16 x 15 (aka open-string patterns), which deliver increased spin potential.

Weight

The heavier the tennis racquet, the more power it delivers. On the other hand, a heavy racquet is going to be less controllable and slower.

All the racquets reviewed belong to heavier racquets – when strung, all of them weigh over 11 ounces. The lightest racquets out there can weigh as low as 9 ounces.

If you have a weak shot, then you can compensate for it by going for a heavier racquet. But if you tend to overshoot the ball, you may want to go for a lighter tennis racquet.

Weight balance

The weight itself is important in tennis racquets, but varying weight balance can make two 11-ounce racquets perform dramatically differently.

The weight balance in tennis racquets can be located in the middle or be shifted towards either the head or the handle. Such racquets are called even-balance, head-heavy, and head-light respectively.

Head-light racquets are quicker and more controllable, but they reduce the power potential of the racquet’s weight. Head-heavy racquets are the inverse, while even-balance racquets deliver the best of both worlds.

Manufacturers usually refer to the weight balance in their racquets in points. A point is equal to 1/8 of an inch. Thus, an 8 points head-light racquet has its weight shifted 1 inch from the racquet’s center towards the handle.

Even a point of difference in the weight balance can play a huge role, so make sure to pay attention to it.

Stiffness

Finally, we have the racquet stiffness.

The stiffer the tennis racquet, the better it is at transferring the power from your hand to the ball. However, a stiff tennis racquet doesn’t absorb shocks too well and thus is straining on your joints. A more flexible racquet thus is more comfortable and soft, albeit with the tradeoff of worse power.

Stiffness is commonly measured with RA or Babolat RDC flex/stiffness ratings. The higher the rating, the stiffer the racquet is. With that being said, the methodology of these ratings may differ somewhat, so you can’t really compare them directly to each other.

Still, a racquet’s flex rating should provide you with a good idea on how the racquet will feel.

FAQ

What’s the best tennis racquet brand?

It’s difficult to determine which brand is the best. Every racquet manufacturer has its good things.

Wilson and Babolat are fairly popular though, and they do make excellent racquets. With them, you can be sure that you are getting great quality and performance. You may go with any of the other brands we overviewed as well.

What is the difference between racket and racquet?

These are just different spellings of the same word, though racquet is more often used in sports like squash or badminton. The International Tennis Federation uses racket, but racquet is also used quite often by tennis equipment manufacturers.

Is a graphite tennis racquet good?

Yes, graphite racquets are strong and relatively light. They tend to provide great power, control, and ball feel, but how the racquet will feel depends more on the specs we described above. Remember, a racquet’s performance is determined by the combination of its specs.

We will be happy to hear your thoughts

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